How NOT to Clean Your Drip Pans

Look at that typo. I'm going to call it irony and let it stand.
I had this brilliant idea. Why not use Barkeeper's Friend on grungy drip pans?

Most drip pans are chrome-plated, right? And Barkeeper's Friend is supposed to be good on chrome. . . (According to their label, anyway.)

Well, either my drip pans are aluminum, or Barkeeper's Friend is NOT good for chrome.

I will say this: It certainly cut through the burnt-on crud in accordance with my expectations.

But. . .The places where I scrubbed the hardest came out looking like brass.


It was really hard to photograph. Since the pans are clean and shiny now, they are also very reflective. . . This should give you the general idea, though.

So. Barkeeper's Friend on drip pans of unidentified metal: only do it if you don't mind them changing color in the process.


The day wasn't a total loss, though. Did you know that most electric stove-tops can be lifted and cleaned under?

This was news to me a couple weeks ago! No lock or lever like if you're popping the hood of your car, just lift straight up at the front, and there will probably be some arms that will lock into place to keep it lifted while you clean.

As you can see, my under-stove-top needed to be cleaned under. Crumbs. . .a burnt fraction of dry noodle. . .some brown grease. . .and my favorite: an erstwhile puddle of starchy water from when the rice boils over. Yum!

So whether you're cleaning your drip pans today or not, you might lift up that stove top and see what you discover.


Hey. So how do YOU clean your drip pans?






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Too Much Time On My Hands



Comments

  1. I feel your pain, my drip pans are abysmal. I tried something from Pinterest. Ammonia in a plastic bag. I had to double freezer bag the bags, but still.
    I poured about a half a cup (to a cup?) of ammonia in a freezer bag, put one of the drip pans in and put the whole thing outside on the patio concrete (with some newspaper under them). I used one bag per pan. My drip pans were too far gone for it to clean them spotless, but the crud that COULD come off, DID and easily. I left them out all night and all the next day, in the shade. Apparently the ammonia "steams" the drip pans making the crud wipe off easily or rinse off easily.
    Word of warning: it stinks. It's ammonia. But it's easy. I would recommend going to Pinterest and finding the pin and link for all the information.
    But it worked pretty well for me :)

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    Replies
    1. Huh! That does sound really easy. I've never cleaned with ammonia before, but maybe it's worth a try....Thanks!

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  2. I use oven cleaner, actually. I had a friend recommend it to me, and it's worked really well on my drip pans :)

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  3. I learned about opening the oven lid by accident. It's when I fell and jabbed the mop handle hard enough to knock the oven top up a bit.

    Nobody notices the discolaration, do they? It almost looks like it's been affected by the Midas touch. :)

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    Replies
    1. Ouch!

      :) That's one way to look at it! I figure this is my excuse to NEVER bother cleaning my drip pans again, and then just replace them when I move out. Because, I mean, they'll need to be replaced anyway. . ..

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  4. This is what i always do to clean my stove . Cleaner Jobs

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  5. I'm going to have to try lifting up the lid of my stove. I'm sure it is filthy under there.

    Drip pans - mine are so cruddy I'm thinking there's really no hope. I just need to buy a new set and work harder at cleaning them BEFORE they get so bad.

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  6. I clean my drip pans with water and dishwashing machine detergent... on the stove in a large frying pan filled with water. Let the concoction sit at a low boil for a good 30 minutes. All the gunk will wipe off pretty easily!

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  7. I use ammonia too. Put a garbage bag in the mop bucket. Place the stove pans or gas burner grates in the bag and pour in about a cup of ammonia in the bag and quickly tie it shut. Since I do this before I go to bed, I leave it in the kitchen, but you could sit it outside on the patio. In the morning empty the bag into the sink and quickly spray it off with cold water. What doesn't rinse off, will wipe off easily.

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  8. Bon ami! It's cheap, non-toxic, and amazing!!!! It's similar to barkeeper's friend, but not abrasive and it won't do what barkeeper's friend did to your drip pans. Just a little scrub with bon-ami and they shine! I also use it on all my faucets to make them sparkle :)

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  9. I did the ammonia in a bag on my burner pans and gas burner racks at my moms and it worked great! http://www.onegoodthingbyjillee.com/2012/01/cleaning-those-nasty-stove-burner-pans.html

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